Posts tagged ‘David Mitchell’

August 9, 2015

Top 10 Fiction and Non-Fiction: August 2015

by Team Riverside

Harper Lee GO SET A WATCHMANLena Dunham NOT THAT KIND OF GIRL

No surprise this month – Harper Lee is back, back, back. The holiday reading season has also revived several titles including The Girl on the Train, which benefited from a Radio 4 adaptation. Incidentally, Go Set a Watchman is not the only literary sequel in town: The Meursalt Investigation is an Algerian writer’s companion novel to The Outsider, set 70 years after the Camus classic.

Top 10 Fiction

1 Go Set a Watchman – Harper Lee
2 The Girl on the Train – Paula Hawkins
3 How to Be Both – Ali Smith
4 Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage – Haruki Murakami
5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
6 The First Bad Man – Miranda July
7 The Bone Clocks – David Mitchell
8 The Paying Guests – Sarah Waters
9 Curtain Call – Anthony Quinn
10 The Meursalt Investigation – Kamel Daoud

Bubbling under: Wake Up, Sir! – Jonathan Ames

Top 10 Non-Fiction

1 Not That Kind of Girl – Lena Dunham
2 Gut: The Inside Story of our Body’s Most Underrated Organ – Giulia Enders
3 The Churchill Factor – Boris Johnson
4 Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind – Yuval Noah Harari
5 Think Like an Artist – Will Gompertz
6 Yes Please – Amy Poehler
7 London: A Travel Guide Through Time – Matthew Green
8 The Opposite of Loneliness – Marina Keegan
9 Spinster: Making a Life of One’s Own – Kate Bolick
10 London Thames Path – David Fathers

Bubbling under: How We Are – Vincent Deary

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July 2, 2015

Top 10 Fiction and Non-Fiction: July 2015

by Team Riverside

Ali Smith HOW TO BE BOTHGiulia Enders GUT

Readers are clearly in search of summer reads at the Riverside this month, and the big names – Smith, McEwan, Mitchell, Waters, Mantel – are moving fast. As always, non-fiction is where the more unexpected bestsellers crop up. Who’d have thought an illustrated exploration of the gut would be leading the pack? German microbiologist Giulia Enders explains how the gut is one of the most complex parts of our anatomy. It’s a sort of scientific toilet book that makes the case for digestive health. Nick Robinson’s election diary is also proving popular – the BBC man’s previous book was one of our political picks of 2013.

Top 10 Fiction

1 How to Be Both – Ali Smith
2 Us – David Nicholls
3 The Children Act – Ian McEwan
4 The Bees – Laline Paull
5 The Paying Guests – Sarah Waters
6 The Bone Clocks – David Mitchell
7 The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher – Hilary Mantel
8 The Monogram Murders – Sophie Hannah
9 Emma – Alexander McCall Smith
10 The Sunrise – Victoria Hislop

Bubbling under: 10:04 – Ben Lerner

Top 10 Non-Fiction

1 Gut: The Inside Story of our Body’s Most Underrated Organ – Giulia Enders
2 Yes Please – Amy Poehler
3 How We Learn – Benedict Carey
4 Ardennes 1944: Hitler’s Last Gamble – Antony Beevor
5 Election Notebook – Nick Robinson
6 Etape: The Untold Stories of the Tour de France’s Defining Stages – Richard Moore
7 Keeping an Eye Open: Essays on Art – Julian Barnes
8 Please, Mister Postman – Alan Johnson
9 Black Sea: Coasts and Conquests – From Pericles to Putin – Neal Ascherson
10 Jeremy Hutchinson’s Case Histories: From Lady Chatterley’s Lover to Howard Marks – Thomas Grant

Bubbling under: Trigger Warning: Is the Fear of Being Offensive Killing Free Speech? – Mick Hume

January 15, 2013

The Paris Review, Granta

by Andre

THE PARIS REVIEW 203GRANTA no. 122

New issues out now – £12.99

Object Lessons, the superlative collection of short stories from The Paris Review, was a literary hit over Christmas. For anyone enraptured by that anthology of favourites from the New York magazine’s 60-year history, the obvious next step is to acquire a quarterly habit for The Paris Review’s inventive fiction, poetry and prose from international authors. Issue 203 features new fiction and poetry from James Salter, Rachel Kushner, Sarah Frisch, Tim Parks, Peter Orner, Ben Lerner and Geoffrey Hill, as well as Pulphead essayist John Jeremiah Sullivan and editor Lorin Stein’s interviews from the First Annual Norwegian-American Literary Festival.

British literary magazine Granta, which features award-winning reportage, memoir, fiction and photography, will be making headlines in the spring when it publishes its once-a-decade list of the best of young British novelists. In 2003, their literary roll call included David Mitchell, Zadie Smith and Sarah Waters. The latest issue, no. 122, has the stinging theme of betrayal with new writing by Ben Marcus, Janine di Giovanni, Karen Russell, Samantha Harvey, Colin Robinson and John Burnside.