Archive for August, 2018

August 27, 2018

Sabrina by Nick Drnaso

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Granta, £16.99, out now

Nick Drnaso Sabrina

This graphic novel has been making waves outside the comics scene, exemplified by its inclusion – gasp – in the Man Booker prize longlist this year, the first funny-picture-word-bubble book to be so.

And it’s easy to see why. This intelligent and affecting work has in its crosshairs a swathe of modern maladies, from the pervasiveness of fake news and conspiracy legitimacy to the prevalence of non-specific alienation and mental illness. Make no mistake, this is heavy – just listen to the plot: the titular Sabrina has, out of the blue, disappeared, and her quietly distraught boyfriend has moved in with an old school-buddy, the nominal centre of the story. He wants to help his friend, with whom he’d all but lost touch, but he’s got problems of his own – namely a failed marriage and a young daughter he never gets to see. And when new information about Sabrina’s situation emerges, his troubles are about to multiply in a distinctly 21st century way…

From this framework Drnaso constructs an unsettling, paranoid world, but it’s a very recognisable one, cleaving very close to our current reality. It’s a testament to his skills as a storyteller that every damning reference to modernity – from one character’s urge to another not to unplug his phone (which the latter is using for a pivotal phone-call) as he needs it charged for work, to a constant, inescapable onslaught of emails a protagonist must at one point suffer – feels natural and unforced. Awkward Skype calls, violent video games, online hate-campaigns, clickbait… they’re all peppered throughout without feeling like clutter. He hunts big game effortlessly while propelling a queasily gripping narrative, a world away from traditional missing-person procedurals but just as enthralling. Certain sequences really bring out the armpit-sweat.

But what of the graphic part of this graphic novel? Sabrina’s visuals are, frankly, bland, its characters simply depicted, androgynous snow-man shapes with dot eyes and thin lines for mouths; at times, they make Tintin look photorealist. When they experience strong emotion, there’s a haunting disconnect between their rudimentary features and their apparent anguish; but mostly each ambiguous countenance suits this sterile world of platitudinous conversation, missed signals and repression. Every backdrop is minimally, if accurately, drawn, bright colours are almost entirely absent, and somehow this banal milieu quickly becomes engrossing in its own way. Indeed, at key points in the narrative this unreadability on the part of the characters drives the tension wonderfully, as we cannot suss out their intentions or judge where they stand. Simply put, what at first might seem like an unexciting creative decision quickly reveals itself to be a brilliant and innovative use of the form.

All-in-all this is tough, smart, powerful stuff, form and content perfectly married to craft a cold world of unspoken pain and suffering. If it ticks your boxes, we’d also recommend Art Spiegelman’s superlative Maus, another amazing, devastating graphic novel which we happen to stock as well.

Review by Tom

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August 26, 2018

Penguin Modern series

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Penguin, £1 each, out nowPenguin modern display 180826

This is a superb series of mini books featuring extracts from works by twentieth century authors published by Penguin.  The list is excellent and it is almost impossible to resist grabbing a fistful and bunking off work.

Several of the books are an easy way in to authors I have been meaning to read for ages.  The short collection of essays by Audre Lorde, The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House, boosted me into reading her full collected essays, Sister Outsider.  In an hour’s reading, I had my brain shaken up and challenged by Lorde’s intersectional ideas and beautiful prose.

Other favourites so far include Chinua Achebe’s Africa’s Tarnished Name.  The great Nigerian novelist gives us a series of short essays, and describes a visit to Northern Rhodesia in 1960 made while he was living as an exile in the US.  He boards a bus and sits in the front, next to the driver’s seat.  “When finally I turned around, probably because of a certain unnatural silence, I saw with horror that everyone around me was white.  As I had turned around they had averted their stony gazes, whose hostility I had felt so palpably at the back of my head.  What had become of all the black people at the bus stop?  Why had no one told me?  I looked back again and only then took in detail of a partition and a door”.  He does not move, and when asked by the ticket collector why he is sitting there says: “… I come from Nigeria, and there we sit where we like in the bus”.  He stays in his seat until he reaches his destination, and disembarks to cheers from the black passengers.

Martin Luther King Jr’s Letter from Birmingham Jail feels timely and useful.  “Now is the time to lift our national policy from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of human dignity”.

There are options for pure entertainment and for risky reading.  Whether you need an emergency back up book in case you finish your current one on the tube, or whether you want to treat yourself to a pick and mix of striking ideas and great writing, this series is irresistible.  For the full list see http://www.penguinmodern.com/.  We love our display, too.

August 25, 2018

Signed copies of Patrick Gale!

by Team Riverside

We are delighted to have some signed copies of Patrick Gale’s new novel Take Nothing Patrick Gale signed 180825with You – get them while they’re hot!

August 20, 2018

New Riverside cloth bags!

by Team Riverside

For all your book/chameleon storage needs, our stylish new bags will sort you out.riverside bag photo 180820

Made by the re-wrap co-operative, these cotton totes celebrate our 31 years as an independent bookshop.

Yours for only £5.99!

August 1, 2018

Bank Holiday opening hours

by Team Riverside

Dear friends,

we will be open on Bank holiday Monday 27 August from 11am till 6pm for all your booky needs.

Hope to see you then!