Archive for January, 2018

January 31, 2018

The Last Wilderness: a Journey into Silence by Neil Ansell

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Tinder Press, £18.99, out nowNeil Ansell THE LAST WILDERNESS

Neil Ansell wrote Deep Country: Five Years in the Welsh Hills, a transporting account of living alone in a remote hut in Wales, which has become a modern classic of nature writing.  It was beautifully written, dealing with the choice and personal consequences of human silence and solitude.  His descriptions of the nature that surrounded him (and particularly the birdlife) were vivid.

The Last Wilderness addresses many of the same themes.  Ansell visits a truly wild area of Scotland in a series of solo trips over a year, and also recalls his journeys all over the world.  The silence in this book is not optional.  He is losing his hearing.  He notices over the year that he can no longer hear the songs of different birds.

He still delights in birds: “I might catch a glimpse of a water rail emerging shyly from among the reeds, or a jewel of a kingfisher driven to the coast by bad weather inland.”  His recollections of childhood encounters with nature can also be very funny.  A crow lands on his head and he feels very proud, “… and then it drove its beak into the very top of my skull, as if it was trying to crack a nut”.  He sometimes reminds me of Chris Packham when he’s talking about this period of his life.  Ansell remains engaged with the present, and he reflects as he wanders on the likely impact of climate change on the places he visits.  The area explored is around Knoydart, and is remote and wild enough to appeal to anyone with a love of nature and solitude.

Review by Bethan

January 16, 2018

Under the Same Sky by Britta Teckentrup

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Caterpillar Books, £10.99, out now

Under the Same Sky is a beautiful hardback picture book, from the author of the striking book Moon.Britta Teckentrup UNDER THE SAME SKY

Teckentrup explores the idea of what we share, being here together on this planet, through a gentle rhyme ideal for reading aloud.  “We live under the same sky… in lands near and far.  We live under the same sky… wherever we are”.

Her ingenious use of paper cutting illuminates the text and the message perfectly.  There are likeable illustrations with a focus on the natural world, which will be appreciated by fans of Chris Haughton and Jon Klassen.

As ever with the best picture books, I have bought this one for children and adults. The dedication says it all – ‘For a united world’.

Review by Bethan

January 8, 2018

The Red Parts by Maggie Nelson

by Team Riverside

The Red Parts by Maggie NelsonmaggieNelsontheredparts

Paperback, Vintage, £8.99, out now

Before Maggie Nelson was born her mother’s sister was murdered in a shockingly violent way, an unsolved crime which overshadows the family in the subsequent decades and which Nelson has previously explored in her collection of poetry Jane: A Murder. In 2005 the case is unexpectedly re-opened, The Red Parts, as described in its subtitle, is an autobiography of the trial that follows.

Nelson’s previous book, The Argonauts is a combination of theory and memoir, The Red Parts has these features too, but also mixes in the generic conventions of true crime.

This true crime element is the driving force behind the story, and its tropes seem reassuringly familiar, the hardworking cop, the witness who first discovered the body, the gory description of the aftermath of violence done to a woman’s body. Although of course in the wise hands of Nelson these ideas are not presented without emotionally thoughtful analysis.

When asking her mother why she didn’t tell Maggie that she had had a minor accident, her mother questions what would be the point in doing so.  Maggie replies that, “Some things might be worth telling simply because they happened.” (p31)  Indeed Red Parts questions the ethics over who has the right to tell a story, does she have the right to write about Jane when she never met her, for example? Nelson also discusses whose stories get told at all, by anyone, is Jane’s murder still receiving attention from TV channels interested such as 48 Hours Mystery, and crime bloggers because she was pretty, white and middle-class?

Although she never met her aunt, her violent end shapes her mother’s way of bringing up two daughters, as well as the way her mother reacts to Maggie’s father’s death years later. Nelson is thorough in her analysis of what it means to live under the daily perceived threat of masculine violence, present because of her aunt’s murder, but also just because she’s a woman, so of course it’s there anyway. She is reminded in the gruesome true crime documentaries of course but also in most mainstream culture, Taxi Driver is a particularly difficult film for her and her mother to see, and she reads James Ellroy’s My Dark Places, a book about Ellroy’s murdered mother and his, “subsequent sexual and literary obsession with vivisected women.”(p69), alongside her investigations.

Nelson’s prose deals with the book’s difficult questions with a deftness that, of course, doesn’t ever answer anything, but makes The Red Parts a special and effecting read.

Review by Cat

January 3, 2018

December’s bestsellers – and a Happy New Year!

by Team Riverside

Thanks to all the customers who helped us have a great December.  Our bestsellers for the month were:Robert Sears BEAUTIFUL POETRY OF DONALD TRUMP

  1. The Beautiful Poetry of Donald Trump – Robert Sears
  2. The Power – Naomi Alderman
  3. Women and Power: A Manifesto – Mary Beard
  4. La Belle Sauvage: The Book of Dust v. 1 – Philip Pullman
  5. Swing Time – Zadie Smith
  6. Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls – Elena Favilli and Francesca Cavallo
  7. Private Eye Annual – Ian Hislop
  8. How to Swear – Stephen Wildish
  9. Perpetual Disappointments Diary – Nick Asbury
  10. Sapiens: a Brief History of Humankind – Yuval Noah Hariri
  11. Paddington Pop Up London
  12. The Things You Can Only See When You Slow Down – Haemin Sunim and Chi-Young Kim
  13. Autumn – Ali Smith
  14. Uncommon Type: Some Stories – Tom Hanks
  15. This is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor – Adam Kay
  16. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck – Mark Manson
  17. A Short History of Drunkenness – Mark Forsyth
  18. Not Working – Lisa Owens
  19. Imaginary Friends – Philip Pullman
  20. Faber and Faber Poetry diary 2018 – Poets!

We are especially delighted that we continue to sell many copies of Gwendoline Riley’s excellent First Love, and also Such Small Hands by Andrés Barba.  We are also really looking forward to reading Your Silence Will Not Protect You by Audre Lorde (with a new introduction by Sara Ahmed and a preface by Reni Eddo-Lodge) – our customers are ahead of us on this, having bought many copies before Christmas!