February 14, 2018

Exchange by Catherine Madden and Louise Evans

by Team Riverside

Riverside Bookshop is pleased to be selling the first joint work from the excellent poet Catherine Madden and superb designer Louise Evans.  It is a series of poems and Madden and Evans EXCHANGEillustrations in which the authors alternate inspirations. Half the poems are Cat writing in response to drawings by Louise, and half the drawings are by Louise in response to poems by Cat.

We have signed limited editions of this beautiful book for sale.  And we are especially proud to have Cat as one of our expert booksellers here at Riverside.

A second book by Cat is due out soon!

Advertisements
February 6, 2018

Happy Suffrage Centenary!

by Team Riverside

We are delighted to be celebrating 100 years of women having the vote.  Our main window is full of great stuff in honour of the celebration.  Our children’s display also Riverside shop window with books by womenlooks great.

Among our feminist favourites in store today are:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie – We Should All Be Feminists

Mary Beard – Women and Power: a Manifesto

Juno Dawson – The Gender Games

Audre Lorde – Your Silence Will Not Protect You

Diane Atkinson – Rise Up, Women!  The Remarkable Lives of the Suffragettes

Eve Lloyd Knight and Louise Kay Stewart – Rebel Voices: the Rise of Votes for Women

Roxane Gay – Bad Feminist

Catherine Mayer – Attack of the 50 ft. women: How Gender Equality Can Change the World

Margot Lee Shetterley – Hidden Figures

Ensaf Haider – Raif Badawi: the Voice of Freedom

Malala Yousafzai – I am Malala: the Girl Who Stood up for Education and was Shot by the Taliban

Kate Pankhurst – Fantastically Great Women Who Made History

Kate Pankhurst – Fantastically Great Women Who Changed the World

Penguin Mini Classics – The Suffragettes

Mary Wollstonecraft – A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

Laura Bates – Everyday Sexism

Maggie Nelson – The Argonauts

Sally Nicholls – Things a Bright Girl Can Do

Libby Jackson – A Galaxy of her Own: Amazing Stories of Women in Space

Jo Swinson – Equal Power and How You Can Make it Happen

Elena Favilli and Francesca Cavallo – Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls

Deborah Levy – Things I Don’t Want to Know

January 31, 2018

The Last Wilderness: a Journey into Silence by Neil Ansell

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Tinder Press, £18.99, out nowNeil Ansell THE LAST WILDERNESS

Neil Ansell wrote Deep Country: Five Years in the Welsh Hills, a transporting account of living alone in a remote hut in Wales, which has become a modern classic of nature writing.  It was beautifully written, dealing with the choice and personal consequences of human silence and solitude.  His descriptions of the nature that surrounded him (and particularly the birdlife) were vivid.

The Last Wilderness addresses many of the same themes.  Ansell visits a truly wild area of Scotland in a series of solo trips over a year, and also recalls his journeys all over the world.  The silence in this book is not optional.  He is losing his hearing.  He notices over the year that he can no longer hear the songs of different birds.

He still delights in birds: “I might catch a glimpse of a water rail emerging shyly from among the reeds, or a jewel of a kingfisher driven to the coast by bad weather inland.”  His recollections of childhood encounters with nature can also be very funny.  A crow lands on his head and he feels very proud, “… and then it drove its beak into the very top of my skull, as if it was trying to crack a nut”.  He sometimes reminds me of Chris Packham when he’s talking about this period of his life.  Ansell remains engaged with the present, and he reflects as he wanders on the likely impact of climate change on the places he visits.  The area explored is around Knoydart, and is remote and wild enough to appeal to anyone with a love of nature and solitude.

Review by Bethan

January 16, 2018

Under the Same Sky by Britta Teckentrup

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Caterpillar Books, £10.99, out now

Under the Same Sky is a beautiful hardback picture book, from the author of the striking book Moon.Britta Teckentrup UNDER THE SAME SKY

Teckentrup explores the idea of what we share, being here together on this planet, through a gentle rhyme ideal for reading aloud.  “We live under the same sky… in lands near and far.  We live under the same sky… wherever we are”.

Her ingenious use of paper cutting illuminates the text and the message perfectly.  There are likeable illustrations with a focus on the natural world, which will be appreciated by fans of Chris Haughton and Jon Klassen.

As ever with the best picture books, I have bought this one for children and adults. The dedication says it all – ‘For a united world’.

Review by Bethan

January 8, 2018

The Red Parts by Maggie Nelson

by Team Riverside

The Red Parts by Maggie NelsonmaggieNelsontheredparts

Paperback, Vintage, £8.99, out now

Before Maggie Nelson was born her mother’s sister was murdered in a shockingly violent way, an unsolved crime which overshadows the family in the subsequent decades and which Nelson has previously explored in her collection of poetry Jane: A Murder. In 2005 the case is unexpectedly re-opened, The Red Parts, as described in its subtitle, is an autobiography of the trial that follows.

Nelson’s previous book, The Argonauts is a combination of theory and memoir, The Red Parts has these features too, but also mixes in the generic conventions of true crime.

This true crime element is the driving force behind the story, and its tropes seem reassuringly familiar, the hardworking cop, the witness who first discovered the body, the gory description of the aftermath of violence done to a woman’s body. Although of course in the wise hands of Nelson these ideas are not presented without emotionally thoughtful analysis.

When asking her mother why she didn’t tell Maggie that she had had a minor accident, her mother questions what would be the point in doing so.  Maggie replies that, “Some things might be worth telling simply because they happened.” (p31)  Indeed Red Parts questions the ethics over who has the right to tell a story, does she have the right to write about Jane when she never met her, for example? Nelson also discusses whose stories get told at all, by anyone, is Jane’s murder still receiving attention from TV channels interested such as 48 Hours Mystery, and crime bloggers because she was pretty, white and middle-class?

Although she never met her aunt, her violent end shapes her mother’s way of bringing up two daughters, as well as the way her mother reacts to Maggie’s father’s death years later. Nelson is thorough in her analysis of what it means to live under the daily perceived threat of masculine violence, present because of her aunt’s murder, but also just because she’s a woman, so of course it’s there anyway. She is reminded in the gruesome true crime documentaries of course but also in most mainstream culture, Taxi Driver is a particularly difficult film for her and her mother to see, and she reads James Ellroy’s My Dark Places, a book about Ellroy’s murdered mother and his, “subsequent sexual and literary obsession with vivisected women.”(p69), alongside her investigations.

Nelson’s prose deals with the book’s difficult questions with a deftness that, of course, doesn’t ever answer anything, but makes The Red Parts a special and effecting read.

Review by Cat

January 3, 2018

December’s bestsellers – and a Happy New Year!

by Team Riverside

Thanks to all the customers who helped us have a great December.  Our bestsellers for the month were:Robert Sears BEAUTIFUL POETRY OF DONALD TRUMP

  1. The Beautiful Poetry of Donald Trump – Robert Sears
  2. The Power – Naomi Alderman
  3. Women and Power: A Manifesto – Mary Beard
  4. La Belle Sauvage: The Book of Dust v. 1 – Philip Pullman
  5. Swing Time – Zadie Smith
  6. Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls – Elena Favilli and Francesca Cavallo
  7. Private Eye Annual – Ian Hislop
  8. How to Swear – Stephen Wildish
  9. Perpetual Disappointments Diary – Nick Asbury
  10. Sapiens: a Brief History of Humankind – Yuval Noah Hariri
  11. Paddington Pop Up London
  12. The Things You Can Only See When You Slow Down – Haemin Sunim and Chi-Young Kim
  13. Autumn – Ali Smith
  14. Uncommon Type: Some Stories – Tom Hanks
  15. This is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor – Adam Kay
  16. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck – Mark Manson
  17. A Short History of Drunkenness – Mark Forsyth
  18. Not Working – Lisa Owens
  19. Imaginary Friends – Philip Pullman
  20. Faber and Faber Poetry diary 2018 – Poets!

We are especially delighted that we continue to sell many copies of Gwendoline Riley’s excellent First Love, and also Such Small Hands by Andrés Barba.  We are also really looking forward to reading Your Silence Will Not Protect You by Audre Lorde (with a new introduction by Sara Ahmed and a preface by Reni Eddo-Lodge) – our customers are ahead of us on this, having bought many copies before Christmas!

December 24, 2017

Happy Christmas from Team Riverside!

by Team Riverside

We’ll be here till 3pm today for all your last minute Christmas needs… and today Zeus the dog is in charge.Zeus in charge

Happy Christmas from all at the Riverside Bookshop!

 

December 11, 2017

Christmas opening hours!

by Team Riverside

We have so much great Christmas stuff in we are extending our opening hours!  Come Rosen and Ross BAH HUMBUGand see us and start your Christmas shopping…

Monday 11 December – 9 till 6.30

Tuesday 12 December – 9 till 6.30

Wednesday 13 December – 9 till 6.30

Thursday 14 December – 9 till 6.30

Friday 15 December – 9 till 6.30

Saturday 16 December – 10 till 6

Sunday 17 December – 11 till 6

Monday 18 December – 9 till 7

Tuesday 19 December – 9 till 7

Wednesday 20 December – 9 till 7

Thursday 21 December – 9 till 7

Friday 22 December – 9 till 7

Saturday 23 December – 10 till 6

Sunday 24 December – 10 till 3

Monday 25 December – CLOSED

Tuesday 26 December – CLOSED

Wednesday 27 December – 11 till 5

Thursday 28 December – 9 till 6

Friday 29 December – 9 till 6

Saturday 30 December – 10 till 6

Sunday 31 December – 11 till 4

Monday 1 January – CLOSED

… and then back to normal!

Happy holidays from the Riverside Bookshop!

November 26, 2017

Icebreaker – a Voyage Far North by Horatio Clare

by Team Riverside

Hardcover, Chatto and Windus, £14.99, out nowHoratio Clare ICEBREAKER

An ice cold exploration of Finland and ships, told with style and wit by the author of Down to the Sea in Ships.  Clare travels on the icebreaker Otso, which is clearing a path through the Arctic Circle.

Reflecting on climate change, Clare discusses A Farewell to Ice by Peter Wadhams who wrote of how changes in the sea ice will impact human life profoundly over the coming years (https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/273799/a-farewell-to-ice/).   He also introduces us to the characters of those who do the dangerous work of icebreaking.  There is something very appealing about reading about a whole area of work and life about which you know nothing.  In this way it is similar to Mark Vanhoenacker’s joyous book about being a modern pilot, Skyfaring.

There are pleasing nuggets of information, as you find in the best travel books.  I am looking forward to using the Finnish word kalsarikännit, which is “The feeling when you are going to get drunk home alone in your underwear – with no intention of going out.”  I am already familiar with hygge but this is a useful addition to my vocabulary.

Another pleasure of this book was the reminders to read or reread other eclectic Arctic literature, of which Clare is a fan.  He reminded me to reread Arto Paasilinna’s Year of the Hare (http://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/06/books/a-skewed-and-skewering-look-at-finland.html).

This would be a great present for any armchair (or actual) traveller who favours ice, snow and the Arctic.  Clare’s turn of phrase is vivid: “The ice stretches to opaque horizons.  As the lines of the forest fall away behind us, all bearings seem lost”.

Review by Bethan

November 25, 2017

New signed copies!

by Team Riverside

We are delighted to have some new signed copies in store, both newly published books and a few returning favourites.Matt Haig FATHER CHRISTMAS AND ME

Elske Rahill – In White Ink

Tom Lee – The Alarming Palsy of James Orr

Robert Webb – How Not to Be a Boy

Matt Haig – Father Christmas and Me

Matt Haig – The Girl Who Saved Christmas

Get ‘em while they’re hot!

November 25, 2017

It’s Christmas!

by Team Riverside

‘Tis the season to be jolly and we have lots of amazing Christmas stuff in stock:

-Advent Calendarschristmas cards

-Single Christmas Cards

-Packs of Christmas Cards

-Festive Wrapping Paper

-Christmas Gift Bags

-Ribbon and Bows

-Gift Tags

… And Christmas Joy!

 

 

November 19, 2017

Autumn by Ali Smith

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Penguin Random House, £8.99, out now

 

AutumnMuch has been made of the fact that this is Ali Smith’s “Brexit novel”, which in some ways is to do it a disservice. Because if, like me, the term “Brexit novel” makes you shudder internally and want to reach for the new Lee Childs instead, you’d be missing out on a fascinating entry which manages to look at our newly-divided Britain with a fresh eye.

The plot concerns the curious relationship between Elisabeth Demand, a precariously-employed “casual contract junior lecturer” visiting the town in which she grew up, and Daniel Gluck, her centenarian former neighbour who now lies dying in a hospice. But this is just the springboard from which Smith leads us through a whirlwind of dreams and memories, in tandem with her always-enjoyable day-to-day interactions deftly delivered with the usual eye for eccentricity.

And all this is of course set very much in the present, against the backdrop of the country’s historic decision to leave the EU. Working as she is in a medium where we’re used to clever allusions, parodies, fables and metaphors instead of approaching things head-on, there’s something almost illicitly exciting in the way she occasionally allows her asides about Brexit to be so on-the-nose, never shying away from directly addressing the matter at hand. This feels every inch a book written in the direct aftermath of the referendum, simultaneously angry, confused, ruminative, wounded and playful – which must be a very hard concoction to pull off as successfully as it is here.

At times it feels like Smith is examining this disorienting time in the same way that Gunter Grass so brilliantly tackled the incremental rise of Nazi Germany in The Tin Drum; by focusing alternately on scenes of domesticity, surreality and hard, painful truth.

And as in many of Smith’s novels, it’s somehow dreamlike yet relatable, like a glimpse inside a brain at once the same and totally different to your own. Written in the distinctly idiosyncratic prose – peppered with elastic quips, digressions through language and the occasional startling image – which has won her such a loyal fan-base, it’s no surprise that such a talented writer, wrestling with so seismic a period in our history, has turned out a piece of work as singular as this. Get it down you.

Review by Tom

November 13, 2017

The Alarming Palsy of James Orr by Tom Lee

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Granta, £12.99, out now

Alarming PalsyAnother week, another deeply unsettling novella. Tom Lee’s dream-like tale of suburban living gone awry would make a good companion piece to Matthew Weiner’s Heather, the Totality; but where that short novel felt very American in its evocation of a divided, gentrified New York, Lee’s is distinctly, queasily English, exploiting the tensions behind middle-class social mores.

Unremarkable family man James Orr wakes up one morning to discover he has contracted Bell’s Palsy, which has caused the left side of his face to droop unresponsively. In the hands of Lee, dealing with this plausible (if unlikely) malady becomes a Kafkaesque nightmare, as Orr – like the haplessly metamorphosed Gregor Samsa – tries his best to navigate his life and responsibilities in a world where he has been indelibly transformed.

Suddenly unable to work at his client-facing company, he is forced to confront the grim reality of days unmoored from any sort of routine. Meanwhile his unblemished cul-de-sac community of identical homes is under siege, as youths are using its quiet streets for sexual encounters in their cars. As head of the neighbourhood residents’ committee, James may have to do something – but his predicament is a doubly unfortunate one, as he finds that his face is sufficiently disabled that he often can’t speak or make himself understood.

Tough stuff for anyone to deal with; but like in any bad dream, an inexplicable edge begins to creep into our hero’s behaviour. As his visage is obscured so too are the motives behind his actions, and the unpredictability of the narrative as he becomes increasingly erratic makes for compelling reading.

This is a novel which utilizes its idyllic setting perfectly in a way that recalls Ira Levin’s Rosemary’s Baby or The Stepford Wives, and the slow and innocuous way that an atmosphere of dread is built is remarkable.  A quick, punchy read that stays with you long after the final page.

Review by Tom

November 8, 2017

New Signed Copies

by Team Riverside

We have some new signed copies:

Tom Lee – The Alarming Palsy of James Orr

Matthew Weiner – Heather, the Totality

Peter Stafford-Bow – Corkscrew

Jenny Uglow – Mr Lear

Nigel Slater – The Christmas Chronicles

Jennifer Bell – The Smoking Hourglass

Max Leonard – Higher Calling

Still a few copies left of:

Matt Haig – Father Christmas and Me

Maggie O’Farrell – I am, I am, I am

Uploaded by Arianna

October 23, 2017

Lampedusa – Gateway to Europe by Pietro Bartolo and Lidia Tilotta

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Maclehose Press, £12.99, out now

Lampedusa – Gateway to Europe is a book of extraordinary and moving first hand Bartolo and Tilotta LAMPEDUSAtestimony from Dr Pietro Bartolo who runs the medical services for refugees landing on (or shipwrecked near) the island of Lampedusa in the Mediterranean.  Those he treats are often in profound states of suffering after terrifying flights from their home countries.  He is also deals with the bodies of those who have died on the journey.  Often, the living and the dead arrive together.

Dr Bartolo interweaves the story of his own life, and particularly how he came to be doctor on the island where he was born, with accounts of individual refugees he has met over the last 25 years.  His father was a fisherman, and his family are shown as hard working people with a deep respect for the sea.  He writes: “There is an unwritten rule that you might only understand if you were born on an isolated island like ours: leaving another human being at the mercy of the waves, no matter who they are, is unacceptable – unthinkable, in fact.  This is a law of the sea.  It is taken so seriously that when the Italian government prohibited taking migrants on board a boat, fishermen often defied the law and ended up in court” (p. 87).  He recounts one maritime disaster after another, relentless deaths and terrible injuries, which continue to this day.

He tells the story of the miraculous revival of one young refugee, Kebrat, who has been given up for dead when she is landed on the pier during the catastrophe of 3 October 2013, in which at least 368 people lost their lives.  After 20 minutes of emergency work, her heartbeat is re-established: “I had experienced the greatest surge of emotion in my twenty-five years of first aid work” (p. 190).

The author and his team were seen in the film Fire at Sea (https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/jun/09/fire-at-sea-review-masterly-and-moving-look-at-the-migrant-crisis).  Newly translated from the Italian, the book is recommended by Philip Gourevitch, who wrote the extraordinary story of the Rwandan genocide We Wish to Inform You that Tomorrow we will be Killed with our Families.

My personal view, shared by many others I am sure, is that when the histories of our period are written, future generations will be incredulous that we allowed so many to die while they were fleeing death at home.

The nightmare in the Mediterranean is not over.  Bartolo is frustrated by the variation in media coverage, which is sometimes at saturation point and sometimes completely absent.  This book stands as a lasting corrective to that.  It is an instant classic of refugee and migration writing, and an overwhelming indictment of the human actions that make this happen.

Review by Bethan

October 20, 2017

Ruth and Martin’s Album Club

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Unbound, £14.99, out now

Ruth Martin Album Club.jpgA really interesting conceit here, and well executed; Ruth and Martin’s Album Club is a compendium of record reviews – the twist being that each one is being judged by a celebrity who is hearing it for the first time. For those who agree with Frank Zappa’s famous maxim that writing about music is like “dancing about architecture” and like their reportage on the subject to come with just a bit extra, look no further.

It’s reminiscent of the 33/3 series of books, in which writers delve into the minutiae of a beloved LP of their choosing, but this has an enjoyable casualness to it which makes each entry a joy. Every album has a prologue written about it by the incredibly well-informed Martin Fitzgerald, and these are pleasingly illuminating. He’s got a loose prose style that feels punchy and good-humoured, the compere before the main event – which consists of folks like J.K. Rowling, Ian Rankin, Chris Addison and Bonnie Greer laying out their pre-and-post-conceptions of a classic album they’re hearing for the first time.

This format allows for little windows into the lives of our writers (Martin’s question, put to all participants, of why the hell they haven’t listened to what they’ll be reviewing before turns up some curious answers) just as much as it does fresh perspectives on timeless records. It’s particularly invigorating to hear contributors admitting to not enjoying the kind of hallowed LPs that no one is ever allowed to confess a dislike of, and while I’d disagree with every iota of Times journalist Danny Finkelstein’s distinctly unimpressed review of The Velvet Underground and Nico, it feels delightfully subversive to see it being described in print as merely “OK”.

You also get to hear what Tim Farron thinks about N.W.A, which is information you didn’t know you needed, but most assuredly do. Perfect Christmas fodder for the musically-minded if you’re efficient enough to be looking for presents this early.

Review by Tom

October 20, 2017

New signed copies in!

by Team Riverside

We have some lovely new signed copies including several by a rather famous actor… get them while they’re hot!

Tom Hanks – Uncommon Type

Alan Bennett – Keep On Keeping On

Robert Macfarlane and Jackie Morris – The Lost Words

Armistead Maupin – Logical Family

Matt Haig – Father Christmas and Me and The Girl Who Saved Christmas

Natasha and Lauren O’Hara – Hortense and the Shadow

 

Selling fast right now!

October 17, 2017

To the River: a Journey Beneath the Surface by Olivia Laing

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Canongate, £9.99, out nowOlivia Laing TO THE RIVER

This fresh and interesting account of Laing’s midsummer exploration of the Ouse river is now available in a good new edition of the excellent Canons series.

Originally published in 2011, this is nature writing partly in the vein of Helen Macdonald’s H is for Hawk, or Amy Liptrot’s The Outrun.  Exploring East Sussex in part to get away after a horrible relationship break up, Laing brings a sharp eye to the natural world in what may feel like a very familiar area: “It is astonishing what wood and earth together will yield, given a spark and a puff of air.  A windowpane, say, bubbling and settling into cool green sheets, like ice on a winter’s day” (p. 31).  She preserves a genuine sense of wonder at the natural world, while never prettifying what she experiences.

There are excellent literary stories throughout the book, particularly about Virginia and Leonard Woolf who are strongly associated with this area.  I am a fan but didn’t know that after their house in London was bombed, “the Woolfs went down to salvage what they could from amidst the dust and rubble: diaries, Darwin, glasses, her sister’s painted china.  A melancholy business, but she says she likes the loss of possessions, the liberation” (p. 207).

The steamy heat Laing walks through rises off the page, and we are reminded that midsummer is still something magical, even in the midst of modern life.

Review by Bethan

October 15, 2017

Moominland Midwinter by Tove Jansson

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Sort Of Books, £10.99, out nowTove Jansson MOOMINLAND MIDWINTER

One of the best book things ever has just happened to me.  I discovered that the Moomin prose books are not the same stories as the Moomin comic strips.  This means that there is a whole world of unknown Moomin that I can explore, and I can do it through the beautiful new hardback editions of four of the prose books just issued by Sort Of Books.  This is the reader equivalent of buried treasure.

Moomintroll wakes up from his winter hibernation early, and is surrounded by his sleeping family.  Feeling lonely, but also adventurous, he heads out to see what the winter world is like, and who he can find there.  He makes new friends, and their insights are valuable: after Moomintroll and Too-ticky see the Northern Lights, Too-ticky notes, “I’m thinking about the aurora borealis.  You can’t tell if it really does exist or if it just looks like existing.  All things are so very uncertain, and that’s exactly what makes me feel reassured”.  The gorgeous illustrations and fold out map (complete with Lonely Mountains and Grotto) complete the magic.

A long time fan of Jansson’s Summer Book, a novel for adults, I have found similar themes of kindness and adventure in her Moomin books (see Ali Smith on The Summer Book here – https://www.theguardian.com/books/2003/jul/12/fiction.alismith).  I agree absolutely with Philip Pullman when he writes: “Tove Jansson was a genius of a very subtle kind.  These simple stories resonate with profound and complex emotions that are like nothing else in literature for children or adults”.  I can vouch for the joy of reading them for the first time as an adult.  These are books for every human.  In case the books are not enough, I can also head to Dulwich Picture Gallery’s Tove Jansson exhibition (http://www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/2017/october/tove-jansson/).

There should be a word for the rare feeling that you get when reading a book that is new to you, but which you realise will be a favourite for the rest of your life.  There isn’t one that I can think of, but this book would have occasioned it.

Review by Bethan

October 3, 2017

The Lost Words by Robert Macfarlane and Jackie Morris

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Hamish Hamilton, £20, out nowMacfarlane and Morris LOST WORDS

This is the most exquisite book I have seen this year.  The Lost Words features beautiful illustrations of British wildlife by the amazing Jackie Morris, who did the classic children’s picture book The Snow Leopard (due out soon in a new edition).  Words are by Robert Macfarlane, one of our outstanding nature writers, known for The Old Ways and Mountains of the Mind.  In his book Landmarks, Macfarlane had focussed on nature words being lost from everyday usage, particularly those from local dialects (https://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/mar/08/landmarks-review-robert-macfarlane).

These two working together make for an enchanting combination.  There is a great interview with Jackie and Robert explaining how they made the book, and Jackie explains: “So, it was Robert’s idea to make this a ‘spell-book’ – to have three spreads per word, the first marking a loss, a slipping away, the second being a summoning spell, and the third being the word spelled back into language, hearts, minds and landscape.”  (See https://www.penguin.co.uk/articles/on-writing/cover-story/2017/jul/designing-the-lost-words/)

This book, for all ages, defines key English nature words.  And so, for otter: “Otter enters river without falter – what a/supple slider out of holt and into water!”

This is a big book – 37 by 28cm, giving full space to the luminous illustrations.  It would make an gorgeous present for anyone with a love of the natural world.  If that wasn’t enough, each purchase supports Action for Conservation, funding the next generation of conservationists and with a particular focus on disadvantaged and socially excluded children.  The goldfinches on the cover are reason enough to buy it, and as Riverside visitors will know we have our own tame charm of goldfinches upstairs in the shop (https://theriversideway.wordpress.com/2016/12/09/a-charm-of-goldfinches-grace-our-bookshop/).

Review by Bethan

September 27, 2017

New signed copies in!

by Team Riverside

We have some lovely new signed copies, get them while they’re hot!

Robert Harris – Munich

Maggie O’Farrell – I am, I am, I am

Robert Webb – How not to be a Boy

John O’Farrell – Things Can Only Get Worse

Adam Kay – This is Going to Hurt

Frances Hardinge – A Skinful of Shadows

Nigella Lawson – At My Table

Max Howard – Higher Calling

Selling fast right now!

September 23, 2017

Baking with Kafka by Tom Gauld

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Canongate, £12.99, out nowTom Gauld BAKING WITH KAFKA

You may have seen Tom Gauld’s excellent bookish cartoons in the Guardian Review pages, which are reliably smart and thoughtful as well as very funny (https://www.theguardian.com/profile/tom-gauld).

This latest collection of his work is especially good for those who like books, or science, or both.  His humour is usually deceptively gentle but skewers some modern human moments.  I especially like his very understanding cartoon about the perils of non-scientists buying congratulations cards for scientists (http://myjetpack.tumblr.com/image/164181515985).

The cartoons often feature great literary jokes, and as he sometimes does work for the New Yorker and the New Scientist, I’m sure there are other jokes I’m not getting!  His cartoons make me smile every time I see them.  He is the author of Mooncop and You’re all Just Jealous of my Jetpack.

This is a perfect gift as it is a beautiful hardback (I am already thinking of this for at least four Christmas presents, hopefully none of the likely recipients read this blog).

Review by Bethan

 

 

September 17, 2017

Darling Days by iO Tillett Wright

by Team Riverside

Paperback, Virago, £9.99, out now

Darling DaysA cracker of a memoir this, Darling Days tell the story of author and activist iO Tillett Wright’s distinctly off-the-wall upbringing in the squalor of downtown New York.

With its depiction of an exhilarating if hand-to-mouth existence in the East Village of the 1980s, the punk and new wave subcultures spawned there and the drugs that desolated its communities, Darling Days follows in the footsteps of autobiographies like Patti Smith’s Just Kids or Richard Hell’s I dreamed I was a Very Clean Tramp – both by poets and novelists who share not just glittery New York-based life stories but also a way with strong, beautiful prose. Tough acts to follow, but Tillett Wright more than holds his own on both counts.

He’s certainly had an interesting life straight out of the gate, born to a mother who was equal parts Amazonian warrior and Playboy centrefold, a model, hard drinker, addict and widow (her former husband having been shot by police in dubious circumstances). The pair’s adventures, clashes and anecdotes make for compelling, bewildering and sobering reading; there are several sections in the book, after the young iO has done something like rush to find a cop to protect her mother from an abusive boyfriend, when you find yourself saying, he’s how ­young at this point?

But all these wild experiences can make for sub-par reading at best if the author can’t bring them to life on the page. Thankfully, Tillett Wright’s writing is frankly brilliant; he has a fantastic way with imagery, razor-sharp descriptions of locales and characters bursting fully-formed into your mind’s eye. Angular faces, voluptuous bodies, mean streets and crumbling blocks are drawn in brilliant chiaroscuro style… and, as with Smith and Hell, there is something intangibly New York about it. At times his keen eye for this slum of a city and its crooked inhabitants is almost Dickensian.

The vivacity of Tillett Wright’s storytelling and style really can’t be emphasised enough, and his tale is a captivating one. For a living, breathing slice of a fascinating period of American life, look no further.

Review by Tom

 

 

September 11, 2017

Such Small Hands by Andrés Barba

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Portobello Books, £9.99, out now     Andres Barba SUCH SMALL HANDS

Marina’s parents have been killed in an accident, a trauma that she conceptualises through the sounds of the words used to break the news to her; “Your father died instantly and your mother died just now.”, as well as the smooth white lines of the car seat that she was looking at before the vehicle the family were in is fatally flipped over. The beauty of Barba’s novella, translated from Spanish by Lisa Dillman, is in these details, small horrors described in sentences that are allowed to luxuriate in the visceral heat of childhood, for instance when Marina wets herself after learning she will be sent to an orphanage, “She felt the hot, acidic urine run down her legs to her shoes and she felt the shame, which was also hot: a dark, robust, inescapable mass.”

When she gets to the orphanage accompanied by her doll, also Marina, we are introduced to the rest of the girls who live there. These children who Marina can’t distinguish between, are heard from in unison, Greek chorus style. To them Marina’s arrival is a disruption of their shared sense of self and through her they are shocked into the realisation that they are individuals. Their proceeding obsession with her is disturbing in its violence and sexuality.

The full and descriptive sentences in Such Small Hands are really the best thing about it, and they are particularly moving at the beginning, so much so that when I’d finished it, which I did quickly -it’s a short book, I went back and read the opening part again.  A good one if you like books that describe the dark side of childhood or confusing experiences being richly explored through language.

Review by Cat

 

September 7, 2017

The Gritterman by Orlando Weeks

by Team Riverside

Signed Hardback, Particular Books, £17.99, out now

Gritterman coverFormer Maccabees frontman Orlando Weeks has taken a surprising career-turn into bittersweet picture-books with The Gritterman, a beautifully illustrated and touching tale about a local gritter’s last night on duty.

Our unnamed hero takes us through his life and times in prose written with an understated, colloquial charm, discussing his work (ice cream man on summer days, gritterman on winter nights), late wife and private ruminations. His beloved night-time role consigned to the scrapheap by global warming and a terse letter from the council, he’s a man whose quiet profession – and way of life – is being extinguished by the relentless march of modernity.

Just as his faithful van putters along on its final mission, so he, an elderly man quite alone in the world, moves towards his ultimate destination. But while elegiac, The Gritterman is not depressing, instead finding a sweet triumphalism in a sad situation. As our narrator says; “Being alone and loneliness aren’t the same thing”.

All of this is paired with wonderful drawings by Weeks; and if lovely hand-drawn illustrations, sad scenarios and wintry landscapes are putting you in mind of Raymond Briggs, you wouldn’t be far wrong. Weeks’ melancholic, low-key style and domestic focus feel like a continuation of the kind of themes Briggs famously explored in works like The Snowman and Father Christmas, while his scratchy coloured pencil illustrations marked by subdued blues and flashes of colour recall The Snowman in particular.

But unlike Briggs’ work, this isn’t a comic, instead making use of the ample white space that a novel’s form allows to suggest isolation, and thick blankets of snow. And Weeks’ style is ultimately looser. The gritterman is rendered an incomplete ghost, fading fast; his world a foggy, unfocused one perpetually obscured by inclement weather.

It’s the little details in this book that make it shine, from the “dink on [his van’s] left wheel arch that’s the same shape as Scotland” to the turkey chow mein dinner our protagonist painstakingly prepares, a chunk of which he later removes from his molar with the corner of a Christmas card. Between them and the pictures you could pore over for hours, it’s the reading equivalent of what’s known as chrysalism; the intangible satisfaction of being snuggled up in bed while listening to a raging storm outside.

Review by Tom

 

 

September 5, 2017

Bestsellers in July and August

by Team Riverside

Excellent fiction, a good dose of feminism and fun children’s books make up our top 20 Jennifer Bell THE SMOKING HOURGLASS.pngfrom the last two months.  In reverse order:

Jennifer Bell – The Smoking Hourglass

Jennifer Bell – The Crooked Sixpence

Noam Chomsky – Optimism over Despair

J K Rowling, John Tiffany, Jack Thorne – Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

Emma Cline – The Girls

Matt Haig – How to Stop Time

Elizabeth Strout – My Name is Lucy Barton

Sam Bourne – To Kill the President

Paul Beatty – The Sellout

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie – We should all be Feminists

Haruki Murakami – Desire (Vintage Minis)

Margaret Atwood – The Handmaid’s Tale

David Szalay – All that Man Is

Yuval Noah Harari – Sapiens

Deborah Levy – Hot Milk

Lisa Owens – Not Working

Zadie Smith – Swing Time

Colson Whitehead – The Underground Railroad

Naomi Alderman – The Power

… and at number one, we are proud to announce:

Peppa goes to London!

We predict that this month several new things will fly off the shelves – including Maggie O’Farrell’s memoir I am, I am, I am and John le Carré’s A Legacy of Spies.

 

 

August 28, 2017

Ada Twist, Scientist by Andrea Beaty illustrated by David Roberts

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Abrams, £10.99, out nowBeaty and Roberts ADA TWIST SCIENTIST

This is a very funny, smart and inspiring children’s picture book from the team that brought you Rosie Revere, Engineer.

Winner of the Little Rebels book award 2017 (see https://littlerebels.org/2017/06/25/ada-twist-scientist-is-the-2017-little-rebels-award-winner/), and a New York Times bestseller, Ada Twist, Scientist tells the story of a small girl who starts doing scientific experiments to get answers to the many important questions that occur to her.  “’Zowie!’ said Ada, which got her to thinking:/’What is the source of that terrible stinking?’/’How does a nose know there’s something to smell?’/’And does it still stink if there’s no nose to tell?’”

Ada does indeed possess “all the traits of a great scientist”, and gains the support of her family and friends as she sets out to solve the wonderful mysteries of the world.

Beautiful illustrations complement the text perfectly, drawing out the humour and affection in the words (watch out for a slightly reluctant cat on most pages).  This book has been instant hit with every adult and child I’ve bought it for, so far covering ages two to 69…  One parent reported back that questions starting with “why…?” have now increased in number in their household after the example of Ada!

In a nice nod to important women in the history of science, a note in the back explains that Ada Marie is named for Ada Lovelace and Marie Curie.  Buy it for kids and read it yourself.

Review by Bethan

August 27, 2017

Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Bloomsbury, £18.99, out now

Lincoln in Bardo.jpgIf you turn over George Saunders’ first full-length novel, you’ll be bombarded by so many quotes on the back cover from writing titans that it might lead you to believe that he’s the literary equivalent of the second coming of Christ. Jonathan Franzen says we’re lucky to have him, Zadie Smith asserts that we’ll read him “long after these times have passed”, Thomas Pynchon, Khaled Hosseini, Jennifer Egan, Junot Díaz, Lorrie Moore and more besides all sing his praises.

And the wonderful thing is, they ain’t wrong. Saunders is a singular voice, a writer whose celebrated short stories have combined Pythonesque whimsy, incomprehensible corporate/new age jargon, deep existential ennui and a strong ethical conscience to create a style that is instantly recognisable and wonderfully original. His works are uniquely his own, as funny as they are often heart-breaking – you will laugh, you will cry – and his debut novel is thankfully no different.

A bizarre story – Abraham Lincoln’s deceased eleven-year-old son Willie tries to navigate a transitional stage of the afterlife known as the Bardo over one night of ghostly weirdness – is complemented by an equally bizarre form; when Saunders isn’t leading the plot through playscript-like dialogues narrated from within the Bardo he’s employing an even more remarkable narrative convention, that of telling the tale of the surviving Abraham Lincoln by amalgamating passages from (fictional) history books. This creates a procession of voices mostly many-times removed from the events they clamour to describe. It sounds odd, is odd, but is as wrong-footing and unexpectedly affecting as anything he has written.

It’s not often you read a book that feels as deliciously, daringly new as this. And the fact that, like Saunders’ short stories, it somehow feels casual, unpretentious and effortless just shows the extent of this fascinating author’s talent.

Review by Tom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 21, 2017

Transit by Rachel Cusk

by Team Riverside

Hardback, Jonathan Cape, £16.99, out now

Transit CuskRachel Cusk returns with Transit, the paperback of which will be arriving next month. As a taster, here’s our review of this distinctive and multifaceted novel.

Centred around a series of domestic vignettes, Cusk’s latest follows a narrator who goes not just unnamed for the majority of the novel but unremarked upon, an incisive and mysterious ghost whose duties around a London she has returned to in the wake of a divorce lead her to encounter a cast of old flames and new neighbours. Coldly, detachedly, she questions and interrogates those she meets, leading them into confessions that hold a mirror up to her own apprehensions.

The narrator (and very possibly Cusk’s alter ego) is an intriguing proposition – the kind of peculiar operator who sees fit to ask her hairdresser whether he thinks freeing oneself causes someone else to become imprisoned. She speaks almost entirely in the kind of searching philosophical inquiries that seem at odds with the workaday scenarios she inhabits, putting existentialist queries to friends and acquaintances, handymen and (of course) hairdressers; but it’s through the prism of her idiosyncrasy that these encounters are ultimately lent powerful meaning.

Whether it’s the builder whose failing health may jeopardise his career and livelihood or the ex-partner who appears so unchanged in the decades since their breakup that he may even be wearing the same shirt, much human frailty, eccentricity and beauty is on display here, dug up from beneath the surface mundanity by our guide’s relentless examinations. And, of course, there is the narrator herself; whose chilly, once-removed demeanour may well be reflecting how alone the newly-divorced mother feels in a world of couples, cliques and happy families. It’s a really interesting work, with a great deal to say about the human condition and much in it that readers will recognise about themselves.

Review by Tom

 

 

 

August 16, 2017

Bank holiday opening in August

by Team Riverside

We will be open on Bank Holiday Monday 28 August from 11am to 6pm.